Florida Realtor April 2010 : Page 11

   “If the world is cold, make it your business to build fires.” —Horace Traubel, American writer Manage It grated or have some sort of language skills. It’s very natural for them to de-velop their base in those countries.” 2. Build team knowledge Rayman urges associates to acquire the Transnational Referral Certifica-tion (TRC) and Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS) designa-tions. Just as important is sharing team knowledge monthly. “[Each sales asso-ciate] brings a different perspective— what they’re seeing [concerning] cur-rency, immigration issues, problems that [buyers and sellers] are having, a trend that’s on the upswing or down-swing and why it’s happening and how to capture that market,” she says. 3. Market real listings Make sure your foreign listings are real because your credibility is on the line. “People say, ‘I have this house in Panama for sale,’ but no one really knows who the seller is,” says Rayman. “We have signed contracts and documentation for everything. We know who [the seller’s] attorney is, and we’ve seen the property.” The listings are put on “property list-ing web portals,” chosen on the basis of market matches. “If I want to track to South American buyers, I would look for the largest property portal in South America and get on there.” 4. Make lasting friendships But, says Rayman, working online doesn’t substitute for cultivating re-lationships. Because foreign travel is expensive, when she or a team mem-ber travels, they maximize networking and reputation building. They exhibit at real estate shows, do seminars and media interviews, and tour properties. YOuR InTERnATIOnAL DIvIsIOn Global Sales from Scratch had a buyer who was in Kuwait call because he saw [one of my listings] on a U.K. [website]. The property was in Panama, and he’s calling me in Florida,” says Carla Rayman , broker and international division manager for Prudential Palms in Sarasota. “It can be as crazy as that, and you have to understand how to manage that client.” The key to international success is reducing the distance with personal re-lationships, says Rayman, who in three years grew her brokerage’s international How to set up a global division in your brokerage. “ I division from two to more than a dozen associates speaking 14 languages. Here’s how. 1. Hire passion and know-how Because developing a global business can be daunting, Rayman says, passion and experience are musts. “Someone who just got his CIPS [designation] and who’s never traveled is not the person who should be running your division. “We look for people who either immi-Building global business requires time and effort, says Rayman. “You have to be out chasing the market you want.” Great Idea When traveling abroad, interview local attorneys upon whom you can call later to draw up contracts or provide guidance on local laws for you or your clients.    — Carla Rayman April 2010 FLORIDA REALTOR 11

Manage It

YOUR INTERNATIONAL DIVISION

Global Sales from Scratch

How to set up a global division in your brokerage.

“I had a buyer who was in Kuwait call because he saw [one of my listings] on a U.K. [website]. The property was in Panama, and he’s calling me in Florida,” says Carla Rayman, broker and international division manager for Prudential Palms in Sarasota. “It can be as crazy as that, and you have to understand how to manage that client.”

The key to international success is reducing the distance with personal relationships, says Rayman, who in three years grew her brokerage’s international division from two to more than a dozen associates speaking 14 languages.

Here’s how.

1. Hire passion and know-how

Because developing a global business can be daunting, Rayman says, passion and experience are musts. “Someone who just got his CIPS [designation] and who’s never traveled is not the person who should be running your division.

“We look for people who either immigrated or have some sort of language skills. It’s very natural for them to develop their base in those countries.”

2. Build team knowledge

Rayman urges associates to acquire the Transnational Referral Certification (TRC) and Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS) designations. Just as important is sharing team knowledge monthly. “[Each sales associate] brings a different perspective— what they’re seeing [concerning] currency, immigration issues, problems that [buyers and sellers] are having, a trend that’s on the upswing or downswing and why it’s happening and how to capture that market,” she says.

3. Market real listings

Make sure your foreign listings are real because your credibility is on the line. “People say, ‘I have this house in Panama for sale,’ but no one really knows who the seller is,” says Rayman. “We have signed contracts and documentation for everything. We know who [the seller’s] attorney is, and we’ve seen the property.”

The listings are put on “property listing web portals,” chosen on the basis of market matches. “If I want to track to South American buyers, I would look for the largest property portal in South America and get on there.”

4. Make lasting friendships

But, says Rayman, working online doesn’t substitute for cultivating relationships. Because foreign travel is expensive, when she or a team member travels, they maximize networking and reputation building. They exhibit at real estate shows, do seminars and media interviews, and tour properties.

Building global business requires time and effort, says Rayman. “You have to be out chasing the market you want.”

Great Idea When traveling abroad, interview local attorneys upon whom you can call later to draw up contracts or provide guidance on local laws for you or your clients.

— Carla Rayman

Read the full article at http://browndigital.bpc.com/article/Manage+It/1280405/141630/article.html.

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