Florida Realtor April 2013 : Page 12

Manage It “If you want to succeed you should strike out on new paths, rather than travel the worn paths of accepted success.” — John D. Rockefeller, American industrialist and philanthropist says, “and now he’s eager to collaborate with us.” 2. Pinpoint the countries where buyers are coming from. Delinois researches exactly where buy-ers are coming from (which region in Latin America, Europe, etc.) before ap-proaching brokers about visiting Miami. “Buyers are generated by brokers,” says Delinois, who taps into her franchise’s international database to learn of poten-tial hosting opportunities. “When you form the connections with the right bro-kers, you get to the buyers,” she says. 3. Pull out all stops. Delinois and her team show internation-al brokers their region’s best qualities— from the finest restaurants and en-tertainment venues to the high-end neighborhoods and local haunts. They also develop presentations, glossy prop-erty fliers, and other materials that are produced in the broker’s native language. Patricia Delinois Century 21 Premier Elite Realty, Miami cREATIng OvERsEAs cOnnEcTIOns Get to Know International Brokers echnology, advancements in communications and some-times sheer wanderlust con-verge to create a business world where domestic boundaries no longer con-strain real estate professionals. The question is, how does one go about forming long-distance alliances in an industry that’s largely relationship based? Patricia Delinois , president and CEO of Century 21 Premier Elite Realty in Mi-ami, has the answer. She’s formed ties with brokers and homebuyers in Bra-zil, France, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and other countries. Many of those 12 FLORIDA REALTOR April 2013 T connections translate into sales for Deli-nois, who works in a market where 60 percent of the buyers hail from foreign countries. Here are four tactics that she uses: 1. Host international broker visits. In December, Marco A. Rojas , owner-manager and director of a Century 21 real estate office in Lima, Peru, traveled to South Florida to familiarize himself with the operations and systems of Century 21 Premier Elite Realty. Rojas learned about the region, its real estate market, and the systems and tools used by Delinois’ com-pany. “Marco spent a few days here,” she 4. Always follow up. Delinois sends out newsletters, emails and invitations (for future visits) to the hosted brokers. “This helps to keep my company top-of-mind,” says Delinois, who recently heard from a broker in Ar-gentina whom she’d met in Miami and whose buyer was interested in Miami real estate. “So much of our business is focused on the international audience,” she says, “that hardly a day goes by that we’re not making global connections on some level.” RounduP box: • Host international brokers from countries where your buyers typi-cally come from. • Create quality presentations and glossy fliers in the broker’s native language. • Pull out all stops during interna-tional broker visits. • Develop a follow-up plan for keep-ing in touch with the broker.

Manage It

CREATIng OvERsEAs cOnnEcTIOns

Get to Know International Brokers

Technology, advancements in communications and sometimes sheer wanderlust converge to create a business world where domestic boundaries no longer constrain real estate professionals. The question is, how does one go about forming long-distance alliances in an industry that’s largely relationship based?

Patricia Delinois, president and CEO of Century 21 Premier Elite Realty in Miami, has the answer. She’s formed ties with brokers and homebuyers in Brazil, France, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and other countries. Many of those connections translate into sales for Delinois, who works in a market where 60 percent of the buyers hail from foreign countries. Here are four tactics that she uses:

1. Host international broker visits.

In December, Marco A. Rojas, ownermanager and director of a Century 21 real estate office in Lima, Peru, traveled to South Florida to familiarize himself with the operations and systems of Century 21 Premier Elite Realty. Rojas learned about the region, its real estate market, and the systems and tools used by Delinois’ company. “Marco spent a few days here,” she says, “and now he’s eager to collaborate with us.”

2. Pinpoint the countries where buyers are coming from.

Delinois researches exactly where buyers are coming from (which region in Latin America, Europe, etc.) before approaching brokers about visiting Miami. “Buyers are generated by brokers,” says Delinois, who taps into her franchise’s international database to learn of potential hosting opportunities. “When you form the connections with the right brokers, you get to the buyers,” she says.

3. Pull out all stops.

Delinois and her team show international brokers their region’s best qualities— from the finest restaurants and entertainment venues to the high-end neighborhoods and local haunts. They also develop presentations, glossy property fliers, and other materials that are produced in the broker’s native language.

4. Always follow up.

Delinois sends out newsletters, emails and invitations (for future visits) to the hosted brokers. “This helps to keep my company top-of-mind,” says Delinois, who recently heard from a broker in Argentina whom she’d met in Miami and whose buyer was interested in Miami real estate. “So much of our business is focused on the international audience,” she says, “that hardly a day goes by that we’re not making global connections on some level.”

RounduP box:

• Host international brokers from countries where your buyers typically come from.

• Create quality presentations and glossy fliers in the broker’s native language.

• Pull out all stops during international broker visits.

• Develop a follow-up plan for keeping in touch with the broker.

Read the full article at http://browndigital.bpc.com/article/Manage+It/1347752/151310/article.html.

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