Richmond Family Magazine February : Page 26

kids can-do Tell Your Story BUFFALo HIDE PAINTING undreds of years ago, the Native Americans of the Plains recorded their memories and told stories by painting scenes on the hides of the buffalo – the animal on which they depended. Use this creative technique to chronicle your own tales. Talk to Your Teen Now (cont. from page 15) H What you do: 1. Fold the paper in half, long edge to long edge. 2. Use a crayon to draw half circles over each corner. 3. Tear along the half circle line to make a rough edge. 4. Open the paper. 5. Using colored crayons draw one event you remember. 6. When you are finished drawing, crumple your paper. 7. Ask a parent to make some coffee or tea, let it cool, then pour into a large shallow bowl. 8. Dip the crumbled paper into the tea or coffee. Squeeze or blot out the extra liquid. 9. Flatten and place on newspaper to dry. Intrigued by the tales his mother told him about the first Americans, Philadelphia-born lawyer turned artist George Catlin set off for the West and painted pictures to document what he saw during his time spent with the indigenous people of the Plains. What you need: • Butcher paper or brown craft paper (about 12” x 15”) • Crayons • Coffee or tea • Large bowl • Newspaper Inspired by… Buffalo Chase (Mouth of the Teton River), ca. 1865-1870 Oil on cardboard on bristol board. George Catlin (American, 19th century) VMFA, The Paul Mellon Collection this kids can-do craft is presented by… If you, as a parent, feel that your child may be struggling with stresses that may be difficult to handle, or if you see signs that make you feel uncomfortable, it would be a good time to sit down with your teen and have a heartfelt conversation. If they are dealing with a broken relationship, for example, parents might use a conversation starter like, It must really feel bad. When people are going through difficult times, life feels like it’s not worth living. Have you ever thought about that? “There is a myth that you are giving them the idea of killing themselves, but it’s a good time for them to say ‘I will never do that,’ or you get hesitation [from them] and you know you have hit on something,” Sood says. During these types of conversations, you want to alternate your questioning with supportive statements such as, Nothing is so terrible or hopeless that you need to take your life. “Often your children won’t tell you how distressed they are because they don’t want you to suffer,” Sood says. If you sense they are really struggling, it would be wise to ask them if they would like to see a professional. Parents rarely have the expertise to guide a teen through these troubled waters. When it comes to teen suicide, mental health professionals are also concerned with suicide clusters where a peer’s suicide receives glamorized media attention that, in turn, could spur a teen that is vulnerable to commit the same act. “That doesn’t occur unless there is fertile ground,” Sood says. “Usually there is something else going on.” Slusher says she had a “gut feeling” that something was wrong with Stuart during the last six months of his life. 26 feb 11 richMond faMily Magazine

Kids Can-Do

Tell Your Story <br /> <br /> BUFFALO HIDE PAINTING<br /> <br /> Hundreds of years ago, the Native Americans of the Plains recorded their memories and told stories by painting scenes on the hides of the buffalo – the animal on which they depended. Use this creative technique to chronicle your own tales.<br /> <br /> What you do:<br /> <br /> 1. Fold the paper in half, long edge to long edge.<br /> <br /> 2. Use a crayon to draw half circles over each corner.<br /> <br /> 3. Tear along the half circle line to make a rough edge.<br /> <br /> 4. Open the paper.<br /> <br /> 5. Using colored crayons draw one event you remember.<br /> <br /> 6. When you are finished drawing, crumple your paper.<br /> <br /> 7. Ask a parent to make some coffee or tea, let it cool, then pour into a large shallow bowl.<br /> <br /> 8. Dip the crumbled paper into the tea or coffee. Squeeze or blot out the extra liquid.<br /> <br /> 9. Flatten and place on newspaper to dry.<br /> <br /> Intrigued by the tales his mother told him about the first Americans, Philadelphia-born lawyer turned artist George Catlin set off for the West and painted pictures to document what he saw during his time spent with the indigenous people of the Plains.<br /> <br /> What you need:<br /> <br /> • Butcher paper or brown craft paper (about 12” x 15”)<br /> <br /> • Crayons<br /> <br /> • Coffee or tea<br /> <br /> • Large bowl<br /> <br /> • Newspaper<br /> <br /> Inspired by…<br /> <br /> Buffalo Chase (Mouth of the Teton River), ca. 1865-1870 Oil on cardboard on bristol board. <br /> <br /> George Catlin (American, 19th century) VMFA, The Paul Mellon Collection.

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