ICON Summer 2015 : Page 26

ASID Fellows Represent the Best and Breadth of Our Field Five exceptional designers, practicing at the peak of their profession, have been named to the American Society of Interior Designers 2015 College of Fellows. They hail from the east, west, and middle of the country. They work in small shops, mid-sized firms, and sole proprietorships. They specialize in a wide range of interiors, from healthcare facilities to academic institutions to sustainable luxury homes. They represent the best and the breadth of ASID. ICON asked each what it took to get here. Their answers were, not surprisingly, as different as their work and backgrounds. The specific question we asked: What is the one secret ingredient that makes an ASID fellow? supporting other design-ers and design students in their careers enhances our experiences as inte-rior designers. Jean Pinto, FASID, is an interior designer working in Encino, Calif. She joined the American Institute of Interior Designers, a pre-decessor of ASID, in 1971. She volunteers with the Special Olympics and serves as an advisor at Westwood College and Woodbury University. Pinto holds bachelor’s degrees in interior design and art education from Woodbury University and Pepperdine University, respectively. Jean Pinto: Dedication. You have to be dedi-cated to your profession and enthusiastic about it to succeed. A com-mitment to your career and to the values you believe in is very impor-tant. I’ve been a member of AID and ASID. Both have offered me many rewards through my ser-vice as an active member and as a board mem-ber. ASID stands for the values, education, and principles of the design community, which is why I have dedicated many years of service to the organization at the local and national lev-els and through the ASID Foundation. I believe that Edward Bottomley: Ongoing learning. With each project we undertake, we learn by asking new questions and discovering inno-vation in the answers. Unless you do the same thing every day — and I don’t think anyone in interior design does — every job is different. You may be working on another hospital, but because the owner or location or project man-ager is different, you learn something unex-pected. Every project is a new education. If you become a fellow, it’s because you’ve kept learning for so long. Our meaningful relationships with clients and associ-ates through the years constitute our essen-tial ongoing learning. We immerse ourselves in their knowledge. Ed Bottomley, FASID, is a partner at Cama, in New Haven, Conn. He designs interiors for healthcare, corporate, education, hospitality, and residential clients. He’s an active volunteer with ASID and in his New Haven community, where he serves as an advisor to the board of the New Haven Preservation Trust. Bottomley holds a bache-lor’s degree in the history of art and architecture from Yale University. Trudy Dujardin: Passion. I’m passionate about cre-ating spaces that uplift people’s health and well-being. As designers, we talk a lot about the built environment. That’s because people spend so much time in containers. We wake up in a house. We leave it to get in a car or on a school bus. We go to a school, an office, a medical build-ing, or a gym. We travel, and we’re on an airplane or a train. These contain-ers must support our health and well-being, or, as designers, we’re doing something that’s wrong. It’s not great design if it has toxins that make us sick. I’m so passionate about this. It’s not work to me. It’s my life. Trudy Dujardin, FASID, is founder and presi-dent of Dujardin Design Associates, which has offices in Westport, Conn., and Nantucket, Mass. She designs resi-dential, commercial, and vacation interiors. She serves on the adjunct fac-ulty at Fairfield (Conn.) University and recently published the book, Comfort Zone: Creating the Eco-Elegant Interior . Dujardin holds a bach-elor’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University and is LEED accredited. Joan Kaufman: Continuous improvement. Dedication to continuous improvement — not only of oneself, but also of one’s colleagues and the profession. It’s a mindset that starts with dream-ing big and believing in oneself. Striving toward continuous improvement led me to serve on ASID committees, as a student mentor, and in leadership roles — both local and national — with ASID and other organizations that advance our profession. Motivating colleagues to accomplish our shared goals enables us to achieve more together. By continually raising the standards of our pro-fession, we can provide our clients with the high-est quality design and achieve our full potential. Joan Kaufman, FASID, is principal of Interior Planning & Design in Naperville, Ill., where she designs commercial and residential interiors. She is LEED accred-ited and a certified feng shui practitioner. Her firm was selected the 2014 Favorite Home Designer by the readers of Glancer magazine, in Naperville. Kaufman holds bache-lor’s degrees in interior design and art from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Patrick Schmidt: Humility. Wikipedia defines humil-ity as a clear perspective and respect for one’s place in context. I inter-pret humility as listening to all aspects of a state-ment, thinking quietly, forming an opinion, and stating your view with respect for all those involved. Discussion leads to change, and change leads to a bet-ter understanding of an issue. Discussion will propel ASID to fulfill its mission of advanc-ing the profession and communicating the abil-ity of interior design to enhance our human experience. The English actor George Arliss said, “Humility is the only true wisdom by which we pre-pare our minds for all the possible changes of life.” Patrick Schmidt, FASID, is senior designer at J. Baker Interiors in Carmel, Ind., and a member of the ASID Board of Directors. He is a long-time active volunteer at the national and chapter levels with ASID and in his commu-nity. Schmidt received the Distinguished Hoosier award for volunteer ser-vice from Gov. Mitch Daniels in 2006. Beverly L. Barnes also wrote the national awards story on page 20. 26 icon SUMMER 2015 | THE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS

ASID Fellows Represent The Best And Breadth Of Our Field

Five exceptional designers, practicing at the peak of their profession, have been named to the American Society of Interior Designers 2015 College of Fellows. They hail from the east, west, and middle of the country. They work in small shops, mid-sized firms, and sole proprietorships. They specialize in a wide range of interiors, from healthcare facilities to academic institutions to sustainable luxury homes. They represent the best and the breadth of ASID.

ICON asked each what it took to get here. Their answers were, not surprisingly, as different as their work and backgrounds. The specific question we asked: What is the one secret ingredient that makes an ASID fellow?

Jean Pinto: Dedication. You have to be dedicated to your profession and enthusiastic about it to succeed. A commitment to your career and to the values you believe in is very important. I’ve been a member of AID and ASID. Both have offered me many rewards through my service as an active member and as a board member. ASID stands for the values, education, and principles of the design community, which is why I have dedicated many years of service to the organization at the local and national levels and through the ASID Foundation. I believe that supporting other designers and design students in their careers enhances our experiences as interior designers.

Jean Pinto, FASID, is an interior designer working in Encino, Calif. She joined the American Institute of Interior Designers, a predecessor of ASID, in 1971. She volunteers with the Special Olympics and serves as an advisor at Westwood College and Woodbury University. Pinto holds bachelor’s degrees in interior design and art education from Woodbury University and Pepperdine University, respectively.

Edward Bottomley: Ongoing learning. With each project we undertake, we learn by asking new questions and discovering innovation in the answers. Unless you do the same thing every day — and I don’t think anyone in interior design does — every job is different. You may be working on another hospital, but because the owner or location or project manager is different, you learn something unexpected. Every project is a new education. If you become a fellow, it’s because you’ve kept learning for so long. Our meaningful relationships with clients and associates through the years constitute our essential ongoing learning. We immerse ourselves in their knowledge.

Ed Bottomley, FASID, is a partner at Cama, in New Haven, Conn. He designs interiors for healthcare, corporate, education, hospitality, and residential clients. He’s an active volunteer with ASID and in his New Haven community, where he serves as an advisor to the board of the New Haven Preservation Trust. Bottomley holds a bachelor’s degree in the history of art and architecture from Yale University.

Trudy Dujardin: Passion. I’m passionate about creating spaces that uplift people’s health and wellbeing. As designers, we talk a lot about the built environment. That’s because people spend so much time in containers. We wake up in a house. We leave it to get in a car or on a school bus. We go to a school, an office, a medical building, or a gym.We travel, and we’re on an airplane or a train. These containers must support our health and well-being, or, as designers, we’re doing something that’s wrong. It’s not great design if it has toxins that make us sick. I’m so passionate about this. It’s not work to me. It’s my life.

Trudy Dujardin, FASID, is founder and president of Dujardin Design Associates, which has offices in Westport, Conn., and Nantucket, Mass. She designs residential, commercial, and vacation interiors. She serves on the adjunct faculty at Fairfield (Conn.) University and recently published the book, Comfort Zone: Creating the Eco-Elegant Interior. Dujardin holds a bachelor’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University and is LEED accredited.

Joan Kaufman: Continuous improvement. Dedication to continuous improvement — not only of oneself, but also of one’s colleagues and the profession. It’s a mindset that starts with dreaming big and believing in oneself. Striving toward continuous improvement led me to serve on ASID committees, as a student mentor, and in leadership roles — both local and national — with ASID and other organizations that advance our profession. Motivating colleagues to accomplish our shared goals enables us to achieve more together. By continually raising the standards of our profession, we can provide our clients with the highest quality design and achieve our full potential.

Joan Kaufman, FASID, is principal of Interior Planning & Design in Naperville, Ill., where she designs commercial and residential interiors. She is LEED accredited and a certified feng shui practitioner. Her firm was selected the 2014 Favorite Home Designer by the readers of Glancer magazine, in Naperville. Kaufman holds bachelor’s degrees in interior design and art from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Patrick Schmidt: Humility. Wikipedia defines humility as a clear perspective and respect for one’s place in context. I interpret humility as listening to all aspects of a statement, thinking quietly, forming an opinion, and stating your view with respect for all those involved. Discussion leads to change, and change leads to a better understanding of an issue. Discussion will propel ASID to fulfill its mission of advancing the profession and communicating the ability of interior design to enhance our human experience. The English actor George Arliss said, “Humility is the only true wisdom by which we prepare our minds for all the possible changes of life.”

Patrick Schmidt, FASID, is senior designer at J. Baker Interiors in Carmel, Ind., and a member of the ASID Board of Directors. He is a long-time active volunteer at the national and chapter levels with ASID and in his community. Schmidt received the Distinguished Hoosier award for volunteer service from Gov. Mitch Daniels in 2006.

Beverly L. Barnes also wrote the national awards story on page 20.

Read the full article at http://browndigital.bpc.com/article/ASID+Fellows+Represent+The+Best+And+Breadth+Of+Our+Field/2017814/260108/article.html.

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